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Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to become the world’s most valuable chipmaker in July. Until now, it has specialised in high-end graphics processing units (GPUs). These are commonly used by gamers to deliver more detailed visuals, as well as by professionals for tasks including scientific research, machine learning, and cryptocurrency mining. Nvidia is also one of ARM’s clients, using its designs to create its line-up of Tegra central processing units (CPUs). Under the terms of the deal, Nvidia will pay Softbank $21.5bn in its own stock and $12bn in cash. It will follow with up to a further $5bn in cash or stock if certain targets are met. Nvidia will also issue $1.5bn in equity to ARM’s employees. But experts say one risk Nvidia faces is that the takeover could encourage ARM’s wider client list to shift focus to a rival type of chip technology, which lags behind in terms of adoption but has the benefit of not being controlled by one company. ARM is facing growing competition from RISC-V, an open-source architecture, wrote CCS Insight’s Geoff Blaber in a recent research note. If its partners believed that ARM’s integrity and independence was compromised, it would accelerate the growth of and in the process devalue ARM. Mr Blaber also suggested regulators might block the deal. This process will take months if not years with a high chance of failure, he told the BBC. Mr Huang has said that he expects it to take more than a year to educate regulators and answer all their questions, but said he had every confidence they would ultimately approve Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise to their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So The concern is that there would be which lags behind in

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Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to become the world’s most valuable chipmaker in July. Until now, it has specialised in high-end graphics processing units (GPUs). These are commonly used by gamers to deliver more detailed visuals, as well as by professionals for tasks including scientific research, machine learning, and cryptocurrency mining. Nvidia is also one of ARM’s clients, using its designs to create its line-up of Tegra central processing units (CPUs). Under the terms of the deal, Nvidia will pay Softbank $21.5bn in its own stock and $12bn in cash. It will follow with up to a further $5bn in cash or stock if certain targets are met. Nvidia will also issue $1.5bn in equity to ARM’s employees. But experts say one risk Nvidia faces is that the takeover could encourage ARM’s wider client list to shift focus to a rival type of chip technology, which lags behind in terms of adoption but has the benefit of not being controlled by one company. ARM is facing growing competition from RISC-V, an open-source architecture, wrote CCS Insight’s Geoff Blaber in a recent research note. If its partners believed that ARM’s integrity and independence was compromised, it would accelerate the growth of and in the process devalue ARM. Mr Blaber also suggested regulators might block the deal. This process will take months if not years with a high chance of failure, he told the BBC. Mr Huang has said that he expects it to take more than a year to educate regulators and answer all their questions, but said he had every confidence they would ultimately approve Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise to their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So The concern is that there would be which lags behind in

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Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to become the world’s most valuable chipmaker in July. Until now, it has specialised in high-end graphics processing units (GPUs). These are commonly used by gamers to deliver more detailed visuals, as well as by professionals for tasks including scientific research, machine learning, and cryptocurrency mining. Nvidia is also one of ARM’s clients, using its designs to create its line-up of Tegra central processing units (CPUs). Under the terms of the deal, Nvidia will pay Softbank $21.5bn in its own stock and $12bn in cash. It will follow with up to a further $5bn in cash or stock if certain targets are met. Nvidia will also issue $1.5bn in equity to ARM’s employees. But experts say one risk Nvidia faces is that the takeover could encourage ARM’s wider client list to shift focus to a rival type of chip technology, which lags behind in terms of adoption but has the benefit of not being controlled by one company. ARM is facing growing competition from RISC-V, an open-source architecture, wrote CCS Insight’s Geoff Blaber in a recent research note. If its partners believed that ARM’s integrity and independence was compromised, it would accelerate the growth of and in the process devalue ARM. Mr Blaber also suggested regulators might block the deal. This process will take months if not years with a high chance of failure, he told the BBC. Mr Huang has said that he expects it to take more than a year to educate regulators and answer all their questions, but said he had every confidence they would ultimately approve Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise to their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So The concern is that there would be which lags behind in

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Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to become the world’s most valuable chipmaker in July. Until now, it has specialised in high-end graphics processing units (GPUs). These are commonly used by gamers to deliver more detailed visuals, as well as by professionals for tasks including scientific research, machine learning, and cryptocurrency mining. Nvidia is also one of ARM’s clients, using its designs to create its line-up of Tegra central processing units (CPUs). Under the terms of the deal, Nvidia will pay Softbank $21.5bn in its own stock and $12bn in cash. It will follow with up to a further $5bn in cash or stock if certain targets are met. Nvidia will also issue $1.5bn in equity to ARM’s employees. But experts say one risk Nvidia faces is that the takeover could encourage ARM’s wider client list to shift focus to a rival type of chip technology, which lags behind in terms of adoption but has the benefit of not being controlled by one company. ARM is facing growing competition from RISC-V, an open-source architecture, wrote CCS Insight’s Geoff Blaber in a recent research note. If its partners believed that ARM’s integrity and independence was compromised, it would accelerate the growth of and in the process devalue ARM. Mr Blaber also suggested regulators might block the deal. This process will take months if not years with a high chance of failure, he told the BBC. Mr Huang has said that he expects it to take more than a year to educate regulators and answer all their questions, but said he had every confidence they would ultimately approve Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise to their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So The concern is that there would be which lags behind in

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Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to become the world’s most valuable chipmaker in July. Until now, it has specialised in high-end graphics processing units (GPUs). These are commonly used by gamers to deliver more detailed visuals, as well as by professionals for tasks including scientific research, machine learning, and cryptocurrency mining. Nvidia is also one of ARM’s clients, using its designs to create its line-up of Tegra central processing units (CPUs). Under the terms of the deal, Nvidia will pay Softbank $21.5bn in its own stock and $12bn in cash. It will follow with up to a further $5bn in cash or stock if certain targets are met. Nvidia will also issue $1.5bn in equity to ARM’s employees. But experts say one risk Nvidia faces is that the takeover could encourage ARM’s wider client list to shift focus to a rival type of chip technology, which lags behind in terms of adoption but has the benefit of not being controlled by one company. ARM is facing growing competition from RISC-V, an open-source architecture, wrote CCS Insight’s Geoff Blaber in a recent research note. If its partners believed that ARM’s integrity and independence was compromised, it would accelerate the growth of and in the process devalue ARM. Mr Blaber also suggested regulators might block the deal. This process will take months if not years with a high chance of failure, he told the BBC. Mr Huang has said that he expects it to take more than a year to educate regulators and answer all their questions, but said he had every confidence they would ultimately approve Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise to their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So The concern is that there would be which lags behind in

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Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to become the world’s most valuable chipmaker in July. Until now, it has specialised in high-end graphics processing units (GPUs). These are commonly used by gamers to deliver more detailed visuals, as well as by professionals for tasks including scientific research, machine learning, and cryptocurrency mining. Nvidia is also one of ARM’s clients, using its designs to create its line-up of Tegra central processing units (CPUs). Under the terms of the deal, Nvidia will pay Softbank $21.5bn in its own stock and $12bn in cash. It will follow with up to a further $5bn in cash or stock if certain targets are met. Nvidia will also issue $1.5bn in equity to ARM’s employees. But experts say one risk Nvidia faces is that the takeover could encourage ARM’s wider client list to shift focus to a rival type of chip technology, which lags behind in terms of adoption but has the benefit of not being controlled by one company. ARM is facing growing competition from RISC-V, an open-source architecture, wrote CCS Insight’s Geoff Blaber in a recent research note. If its partners believed that ARM’s integrity and independence was compromised, it would accelerate the growth of and in the process devalue ARM. Mr Blaber also suggested regulators might block the deal. This process will take months if not years with a high chance of failure, he told the BBC. Mr Huang has said that he expects it to take more than a year to educate regulators and answer all their questions, but said he had every confidence they would ultimately approve Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise to their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So The concern is that there would be

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Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to become the world’s most valuable chipmaker in July. Until now, it has specialised in high-end graphics processing units (GPUs). These are commonly used by gamers to deliver more detailed visuals, as well as by professionals for tasks including scientific research, machine learning, and cryptocurrency mining. Nvidia is also one of ARM’s clients, using its designs to create its line-up of Tegra central processing units (CPUs). Under the terms of the deal, Nvidia will pay Softbank $21.5bn in its own stock and $12bn in cash. It will follow with up to a further $5bn in cash or stock if certain targets are met. Nvidia will also issue $1.5bn in equity to ARM’s employees. But experts say one risk Nvidia faces is that the takeover could encourage ARM’s wider client list to shift focus to a rival type of chip technology, which lags behind in terms of adoption but has the benefit of not being controlled by one company. ARM is facing growing competition from RISC-V, an open-source architecture, wrote CCS Insight’s Geoff Blaber in a recent research note. If its partners believed that ARM’s integrity and independence was compromised, it would accelerate the growth of and in the process devalue ARM. Mr Blaber also suggested regulators might block the deal. This process will take months if not years with a high chance of failure, he told the BBC. Mr Huang has said that he expects it to take more than a year to educate regulators and answer all their questions, but said he had every confidence they would ultimately approve Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise to their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So The concern is that there would be

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had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise to their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So The concern is that there would be

Incredible Pokemon Black Rom That Has Dangerous Chambers And Sanctums

Players will love to start the game only when it has interesting twists and turns. Guys those who are looking out game which has unique characters will love the game that is showcased here. Pokeman black and white was launched few years back with a very good reception from all corners of the world and millions of people are playing this wonderful game even now. Playing this exotic game for hours will be a fun ride which cannot be explained in words. Use the password and enter the castle with bold heart only to meet dangerous creatures like fire spewing dragons and other exciting creatures. Players will have to run, jog, walk and do several acrobatic exercises when they travel down the chamber lanes. Hunt down the enemies like brock, misty, volkner and other dangerous vampires to reach the final chamber. The pokemon black rom is the one will be a truly majestic game which will captivate the hearts of the players. Start the journey from western side of Unova and meet the first rival cheren who will wait anxiously for the new player. This is not the end and the new players have to meet hundreds of unique characters before reaching the final level.

Players Will Be Battling Out With Several Cartoon Characters

Set the path with the destructive mind and face the odds with extreme confidence. Gym leader in the Aspertia city is waiting eagerly for the player and he will demonstrate his skills wonderfully with him. Players those who enter the city of aspertia have to acquire eight badges before they enter into the final one. The battle will reach its climax only when the players kill all the enemies during the journey. Start downloading the pokemon black romand play the game round the clock. This game is compatible with desktop computers and Smartphone devices.

Facilities And Options Available With GPS Ford Kuga In Market

Many people are interested to use car navigation system in their vehicle and it is used to locate particular location or destination for the users. This would be more helpful if the user is new to the city. This type of car navigation system will receive the signals from the satellite and identify the position of vehicle in a better way. The directions will be directed to the people with the help of combination of both data and information collected from various sensors. Such receiving of signals and detecting the location of vehicle will be obtained by global positioning system antenna and global positioning system receiver as well. The direction of the vehicle will be done with the help of its direction sensor in the car. There will be car navigation system screen in the display of car which would identify location of the destination in a better way.

Uses Of Databases In GPS System:

We need to map the database of locations collected in it and then we need to check the information which is collected from antenna and sensors. That information will be again mapped with database and will provide results on display of the car with the help of its car navigation system. Sensors used in the devices are direction and speed sensor. The mapping database is accessed with the help of SD card, HDD, DVD and CD ROM. In autoradio gps ford kuga, the car navigation system will be using four different databases in order to decide route for the driver by calculating distance between current location of the car and direction of the car. Those databases that are used for this process are: road network data, voice data, site information data, and background data. The background data contains information about rivers, railroads, and contours. The site information contains information like name of the building and its addresses.